Archive for April 2008

Greatest Songs Series (Day 7) – Sweet Child O Mine (Acoustic) – Guns N Roses

April 25, 2008

A great song that everyone loves. We are almost done with the GSS, only 3 more days, so if you have any requests for top songs please let me know. If not, you get what I decide!!! HAHAHAHA (weird Dr. Evil Laugh)

 

 



 

Wanna learn to play the 100 Best Songs Ever Recorded? Click here!

 

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Greatest Songs Series (Day 6) – Imagine – By John Lennon

April 21, 2008

Day 5 of the Greatest Songs Series brings us “Imagine” by John Lennon. A great song and very simple to play. This is one to play late at night sitting on your porch with a glass of wine. Peace and love to all. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scales, Chords, Progressions & More

Fretboard Theory 2008

The new generation of guitar instruction, Fretboard Theory,
is a shape and pattern-oriented method for jamming, creating and
understanding guitar-driven music. With an emphasis on the guitar
player’s unique perspective, this is the only book of its kind to
include references to hundreds of popular songs! See how chords,
scales, modes, intervals, extensions and progressions apply to your
favorite music. Learn the secrets to songs by Led Zeppelin, Jimi
Hendrix, Blink 182, Pearl Jam, Sublime, Santana, Nirvana, Metallica,
Pink Floyd, Eric Clapton, The Grateful Dead, The Rolling Stones, Stevie
Ray Vaughan, Dave Matthews Band and more! Compose and improvise your
own melodies, riffs, solos, bass lines and chord progressions.
Guitar/Bass edition. Acoustic/Electric. Download a free 25 page
preview at www.Guitar-Music-Theory.com.

Learning Guitar for Free (for Now) on YouTube – By Frank Langfitt

April 17, 2008

Let’s say you want to learn to play guitar — but you don’t have the time or money for lessons.

Why not try YouTube? A number of people teach guitar on the video-sharing Web site, offering lessons for free.

In the past few months, two teachers have posted around 200 videos that demonstrate everything from basic strumming techniques to the opening riff of “Sweet Home Alabama.” So far, people around the world have watched the videos a total of more than 3.5 million times.

One of the teachers is David Taub, who lives in San Diego and often appears wearing a flannel shirt and a backwards baseball cap. A one-time bar band rocker from New Jersey, he opens each video with the same line: “What’s up, good people!”

His most popular video, a simplified version of the Eagles’ “Hotel California,” has been viewed more than 125,000 times.

The other teacher is Justin Sandercoe, who lives in London, where he teaches guitar and plays with a famous pop singer. He’s a mellow presence with an impish grin. Among his song lessons is an acoustic version of Britney Spear’s “Hit Me Baby One More Time” that is surprisingly affecting.

The teachers play slowly and use close-ups, showing each finger movement. If you don’t get it at first, you can hit replay. It’s like having a teacher with endless patience.

The lessons are informal and feel home-made. Sandercoe sometimes appears sitting on his floor, with his hair matted at different angles. Taub’s lessons are mostly unedited and include moments like his golden retriever eating his guitar pick.

Taub sees the videos, at least in part, as a marketing tool for his paid instructional Web site, NextLevelGuitar.com. His videos emerged last year as an experiment when one of his students, Tim Gilberg, shot video of Taub teaching.

“We filmed about 10 minutes in his backyard,” Gilberg recalls. “I put it up on Google. Then I forgot about it. Basically, two months later I went to see how many visitors we had. There were about 6,800 visitors, and I was like: Wow!”

Then they posted the videos to YouTube, and the audience took off.

On the free videos, Taub teaches the basic chords to popular songs, but he holds off explaining some of the riffs so he can drive people to his site. After playing a riff from Sheryl Crow’s “If It Makes You Happy,” he stops playing and says, “But if you want to learn that, you’re going to have to go to our full site for the lead lines, okay?”

Gilberg says the Web site has hundreds of members after only six weeks.

Justin Sandercoe also has a teaching Web site — justinguitar.com. He has a few ads and takes donations through Paypal to cover the site’s hosting fees. But Sandercoe doesn’t charge visitors; he says he sees the site as more of a public service.

“I like the idea of being able to deliver quality guitar lessons to people who can’t afford lessons, or who are in places where there’s not that kind of access to somebody who can teach them the right stuff,” he says.

When Sandercoe was growing up in Tasmania, it wasn’t easy for him to find great teachers. He hopes his videos will help kids in places like Sri Lanka or India who may not be able to learn otherwise.

Sandercoe now has fans around the world, who often e-mail him with questions and requests for specific lessons. One is Linda Dumitru, who lives in the Netherlands and used to pay $26 for a half-hour lesson. But she stopped, she says, because she couldn’t afford it. Then one day she typed “Johnny B. Goode” into YouTube and found one of Sandercoe’s videos.

Now, she plays along to his videos in her apartment after dinner. Dumitru says Sandercoe’s laid-back approach makes her want to learn. She talks about him as if he were a helpful, next-door neighbor.

“Every time he comes, he says: ‘Hi, I’m Justin.’ He says, ‘Don’t worry if you have trouble with the chords, because everybody has problems with it.'”

She adds: “It’s like he understands you. He knows what you’re going through.”

When Sandercoe isn’t teaching, he plays with Katie Melua, a star in Europe, so he’s used to some attention. But his work on the Internet is raising his profile in ways he didn’t expect.

“I got recognized on a bus the other day,” he says, sounding amazed. “I literally went into town to do a bit of shopping, and I was on the way back and this kid goes: ‘Are you Justin, the guy who teaches from YouTube?'”

But if learning pop songs for free online sounds too good to be true, it may be.

John Palfrey, executive director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, says most of the songs Sandercoe and Taub teach are under copyright. He thinks it’s only a matter of time before a licensing company orders YouTube to take them down.

“There’s a very strong argument that the re-use of well-known chords in the sequence the instructor played them would be a violation of the copyright,” Palfrey says.

Sandercoe doesn’t think he’s doing anything wrong. After all, he says, he rarely plays the songs all the way through. But Palfrey says all it takes is a few notes.

And although Sandercoe sees his Internet teaching as a public service, he has benefited from it.

Since he put his Web site up last year, he has developed a long waiting list for the lessons he teaches in person. And both he and Taub say that’s still the best way to learn.

If someone tells Sandercoe to take down his song lessons, he says he will. But his most valuable videos are the ones that teach guitar basics — things like strumming, scales and finger-picking.

And even in the digital age, no one holds a copyright on those things.

Bruce Springsteen Concert Review – By John Halverson

April 17, 2008

Bruce Springsteen, once called the future of rock ‘n’ roll, is now its glorious past. 
Pounding.
Restless.
Unadorned and unstoppable.

Dressed in tight jeans and a black shirt with the sleeves rolled up, Bruce brought his throwback style to the Bradley Center in Milwaukee Monday night. There was no opening act, no choreography, no stopping-proving that the basics can embolden a crowd far better than gimmicks. The word had been that he’d been a little bland – by Bruce standards – in St. PaulBruce Springsteen the night before. If so, Bruce certainly made up for it in Wisconsin. His energy level would put most singers of any age to shame. Blistering from the get-go, songs cascading one to the next-five, six, seven in a row-Bruce was like the kid in his hot rod burning rubber in the high school parking lot. Tina Turner without the short skirt. Jerry Lee Lewis under control.

Joined by the E Street Band, Bruce isn’t about fey prancing and costume changes. He’s got Elvis’s wide stance, the backward body lean and stomp-around-the-stage masculinity. He attacks one guitar as though it was a snake in heat only to exchange it for another after strangling it into submission. Everything’s direct and muscular, a throwback to the days when rockers were “Blackboard Jungle” bad boys.

Bruce’s craggy face is an open songbook, a bar-fighter’s face. His Mount Rushmore jaw and hooked nose were seemingly carved by a stonecutter who only knew sharp angles. Moving from joy to angst-ridden and back again, it seethes with emotion-cracking into fissures and grooves with one lyric only to snarl back to life with another. And, through it all, Bruce seems to be having as great time as anyone in the audience. His voice, as gravelly and booming at the beginning of a concert as at the end, was worn to perfection at birth. His pipes are damaged goods of the best kind. As for nostalgia, forget it. If you go to a Bruce Springsteen concert to hear the golden oldies, you’ve come to hear the wrong musician. True believers know every song by heart, but for most of us it’s the performances, not the records, that sizzle their way into rock ‘n’ roll history. Bruce may be 58 years old on the calendar, but no one’s told him that yet-so the rest of us boomers don’t believe it about ourselves either. For Bruce, there’s no living in the past, no waiting to have a good time.

The son of a bus driver and schooled by watching Elvis on Ed Sullivan, Bruce never cheats an audience out of its hard-earned money. As if to prove it, the closing song was a St. Patrick’s Day anthem, one he performed for one audience only, for a single performance this year at least. He didn’t have to do it. But Bruce is a down-to-earth lunch-pail performer, who was working overtime Monday night to make sure everyone went home happy.
It was a job well done.

 

Get Springsteen tickets from StubHub here!

Greatest Songs Series (Day 5) – (Sittin On) The Dock of the Bay – Otis Redding

April 16, 2008

Day 5 of the Greatest Songs Series brings us the Otis Redding classic (Sittin On) The Dock of Bay. It was rated number #33 of all time greatest songs by somebody :). So have a try at it!

 



 

Wanna learn to play the 100 Best Songs Ever Recorded? Click here!  

Greatest Songs Series (Day 4) – Like A Rolling Stone – Bob Dylan

April 14, 2008

One of the greatest songs ever written. “Like a Rolling Stone” is a song by Bob Dylan from his album Highway 61 Revisited. First issued in 1965, it represents in its length, style, and scoring, one of the most influential of Dylan’s songs. Rolling Stone magazine ranked it as the greatest song of all time, declaring, “No other pop song has so thoroughly challenged and transformed the commercial laws and artistic conventions of its time.” In his 1988 speech inducting Dylan into the Rock and Roll Hall of FameBruce Springsteen remembered, “The first time I heard Bob Dylan, I was in the car with my mother listening to WMCA, and on came that snare shot that sounded like somebody had kicked open the door to your mind”. In addition to the Rolling Stone ranking, website Acclaimed Music also ranks it #1 on its Top 3000 songs list, based on a number of reviews and “best of” lists.



 

 

Wanna learn to play the 100 Best Songs Ever Recorded? Click here!
 

Greatest Songs Series (Day 3) – No Woman, No Cry – Bob Marley

April 10, 2008

It’s day number 3 in our Greatest Songs Series. Today’s song is “No Woman, No Cry” by Bob Marley. The video that I have chosen comes from my buddy Desi Serna. He is an incredible guitar player and teacher, and has even been featured in Rolling Stone Magazine for his online guitar instruction books. This video will show you not only how to play the song, but will explain how to solo over the song using the major/pentatonic scales. There is a link to his site below the video if you want to check it out (there’s a free 25 page ebook offer that is very cool). Enjoy!



 


Scales, Chords, Progressions & More

Fretboard Theory 2008

The new generation of guitar instruction, Fretboard Theory,
is a shape and pattern-oriented method for jamming, creating and
understanding guitar-driven music. With an emphasis on the guitar
player’s unique perspective, this is the only book of its kind to
include references to hundreds of popular songs! See how chords,
scales, modes, intervals, extensions and progressions apply to your
favorite music. Learn the secrets to songs by Led Zeppelin, Jimi
Hendrix, Blink 182, Pearl Jam, Sublime, Santana, Nirvana, Metallica,
Pink Floyd, Eric Clapton, The Grateful Dead, The Rolling Stones, Stevie
Ray Vaughan, Dave Matthews Band and more! Compose and improvise your
own melodies, riffs, solos, bass lines and chord progressions.
Guitar/Bass edition. Acoustic/Electric. Download a free 25 page
preview at www.Guitar-Music-Theory.com.